Success Stories http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories.aspx Below is a list of stories and articles about the Edmonton Police Service and its members. en 05 Dec 2016 14:28:34 UT Commitment to Professionalism - Reduced Crime &amp; Victimization - Investigative Excellence - Increased Efficiency &amp; Effectiveness<br /> Copyright &copy; 2016, Edmonton Police Service. All rights reserved. EPS members take introductory sign language course http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/ASL.aspx On November 23 and 24, EPS tried out a new idea: an American Sign Language (ASL) course for sworn members. <p style="text-align: center; margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><a href="~/media/7E1BBD9A21A64F09914821675B5F4B3B.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="height: 159px; width: 350px;" src="~/media/7E1BBD9A21A64F09914821675B5F4B3B.ashx" /></a></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">The initiative started when Cst. Dave Castillo, a patrol member in SE Division, brought forward a proposal to take ASL training. Iman Saidi, with the EPS Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section discussed the idea with other frontline members, and it became clear that communicating with the Deaf community is an issue service-wide. &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">Iman worked with Deaf &amp; Hear Alberta, a non-profit society dedicated to removing barriers for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, and put together a two-day course tailored to the needs of police. &ldquo;What I learned is that the Deaf community has their own language and culture,&rdquo; explains Iman. &ldquo;And with our efforts to build police trust within different communities in Edmonton, this course seemed like a perfect fit.&rdquo; The course was taught by a facilitator from Deaf &amp; Hear Alberta, and two patrol members from each division took part in the basic ASL and Deaf culture training.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">Cst. Dustin Bowdige, who learned some ASL in the past, can attest to the value of basic sign language for patrol members. &ldquo;I was on a call where the individual was suicidal. Another family member, who was deaf, ran outside the house and was trying to communicate. I was able to sign with the family member enough to understand what was going on inside the house,&rdquo; recalls Cst. Bowdige. &ldquo;Having a basic understanding of sign language will help patrol members to speak with those who are deaf or hard of hearing in a way they are more comfortable with.&rdquo; </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">This was EPS&rsquo;s first ASL course, and participants and organizers will evaluate its effectiveness to determine whether further training may be offered in the future.</p> 25 Nov 2016 21:59:00 UT EPS Wins Wolf Award http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/WolfAward.aspx EPS is the first law enforcement organization ever to be considered for this national award. <p><a href="~/media/541D1421739A405F902CCC36A4BF654E.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="margin-bottom: 2px; height: 302px; width: 200px; float: left; margin-right: 2px;" src="~/media/541D1421739A405F902CCC36A4BF654E.ashx?h=527&amp;w=350" /></a>On October 26, Chief Rod Knecht was proud to accept the Wolf Award for the Edmonton Police Service&rsquo;s work with Edmonton&rsquo;s Indigenous community. EPS is the first law enforcement organization ever to be considered for this national award.</p> <p>The Wolf Project is a grassroots Canadian initiative that was established to honour activities that serve to improve harmony between cultures. Winners are selected by a board of seven members located across Canada. EPS was recognized for the work of its <a href="~/link.aspx?_id=34A1731280764715A16809D2058086DC&amp;_z=z">Indigenous Relations Unit </a>and the Oskayak Police Academy, a two-week program for youth between the ages of 14 and 18 who self-identify as Indigenous. </p> <p style="text-align: left;">&ldquo;We take great pride in the amount of support we have from our community,&rdquo; said Chief Rod Knecht. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s only because of our strong partnerships with community and government organizations that we&rsquo;re able to offer the kinds of programs that make our police service unique in Canada.&rdquo;</p> <p>The EPS is proud to work with Amiskwaciy Academy, Bent Arrow Traditional Healing Society, M&eacute;tis Child and Family Services, Edmonton Public Schools, Edmonton Catholic Schools, REACH Edmonton and Metro Continuing Education in running the Oskayak Police Academy.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="~/media/69013C15FC724E0499E1C86187CF730D.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img width="350" height="192" alt="" src="~/media/69013C15FC724E0499E1C86187CF730D.ashx?h=192&amp;w=350" width="350" height="192" /></a></p> 26 Oct 2016 15:29:00 UT Report Highlights Potential for Partnership and Engagement with Somali Community http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/Success%20Story.aspx A report on the relationship between the police and the local Somali community was presented to the Edmonton Police Commission (EPC) on October 20, 2016, and revealed some positive perceptions of police activities and an optimistic outlook for the future. <p>The findings of the report were generally quite affirmative for the Edmonton Police Service (EPS) and highlight a culture that emphasizes the importance of community policing and relationship building in diverse communities.&nbsp; </p> <p>While the study identified some areas of tension and improvements that could be made in service delivery, it also documented examples of successful community outreach, along with the desire for young Somali-Canadians and police officers to build better relationships.</p> <p>Surprisingly, police officers were identified as the least likely source of discrimination identified by&nbsp;the sample of young Somali Canadians.&nbsp; When asked about the most common sources of discrimination, school staff, co-workers, employers, and members of the general public were commonly identified much more often than were&nbsp;police officers.</p> <p>The one-year independent study that looked at the cities of Edmonton and Toronto was undertaken by Dr. Sandra Bucerius, Associate Professor for Sociology and Criminology at the University of Alberta, and Dr. Sara Thompson, Associate Professor for Criminology at Ryerson University. </p> <p>The report focused on:</p> <ul> <li>A qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews and surveys with Somali-Canadians and police officers.&nbsp; </li> <li>An examination of strategies that police and their relevant community partners deploy to communicate with and build relationships with the Somali community. </li> </ul> <p>The report found:</p> <ul> <li><b>Knowledge of the Somali community</b> &ndash; Across the EPS, members had a good general knowledge of the Somali community in Edmonton. </li> <li><b>General emphasis on policing</b> &ndash; The majority of EPS officers agreed that the police service had a very strong community engagement / policing orientation. </li> <li><b>General thoughts on building relationships with community members</b> &ndash; The majority of participants emphasized that cultivating strong and trusting relationships with community members is a prerequisite for good police work.&nbsp; More specifically, listening to and learning from community members and adapting policing strategies to their needs. </li> <li><b>The role of training</b> &ndash; All officers stressed the importance of training to understand community engagement and develop a community mindset to execute their duties. </li> <li><b>Relationship with the Somali community in Edmonton</b> &ndash; Most interviewed identified the investigation of the Papyrus Lounge homicide on January 1, 2011, as a turning point for how police engage with diverse communities.&nbsp; They acknowledge that there were deliberate efforts afterwards to improve the relationship.&nbsp; Although there are still tensions and misunderstandings that arise between the community and police, police officers are more culturally aware now than before. </li> <li><b>Approach to policing radicalization</b> &ndash; Two thirds of police members were aware of radicalization, and identified building strong relationships and behaviour change as primary tools for policing.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </li> </ul> <p>The report&rsquo;s recommendations include:</p> <ul> <li>More interactions and outreach with young people of Somali culture. </li> <li>Leveraging technology and knowledge to create cultural app tools for officers. </li> <li>More cultural-specific training days and takeaway messages for officers. </li> </ul> <p>While the study was done in 2015, some of the recommendations have already been implemented.&nbsp; </p> <p>The EPS Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section currently provides bias awareness, effective communication, and cultural safety training to all police officers to help them better interact with the growing diversity of Edmonton&rsquo;s citizens and visitors. &nbsp;This training continues to evolve based on the needs of the community and police. </p> <p>The Section is also involved in numerous police / community partnerships, including ones to proactively identify risks and intervene prior to incidents occurring.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As well, the EPS continues to create opportunities to build understanding and trust with the local Somali community through: </p> <ul> <li>Operating a community-policing model and beat officers who are familiar with specific communities. </li> <li>Utilizing the EPS Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section to educate officers and community members about each other. </li> <li>Assisting with the integration of newcomers and helping them understand the roles and responsibilities of police in Canada. </li> <li>Coordinating meetings between the Chief&rsquo;s Advisory Council and community and youth to share information and explore opportunities for partnerships. </li> <li>Offering police and youth engagement initiatives for ethnocultural youth to bring groups together to better understand each other. </li> <li>Assisting in mentoring students one-on-on and helping them feel safe through the School Resource Officer Program. </li> <li>Providing a Citizen Police Academy to involve residents in crime prevention. </li> <li>Scheduling recruiting sessions at community events for youth interested in becoming police officers. </li> <li>Participating in community festivals and sporting events. </li> </ul> <p>Overall, members of the EPC, EPS, and the Somali community are encouraged by the report&rsquo;s findings and supportive of the ongoing efforts to work together to foster a climate of mutual respect, safety and security.&nbsp; </p> <p>&ldquo;You build relationships with communities how you build relationships with any other person. &nbsp;You sit down, you talk, you listen to each other, you don&rsquo;t go to people and tell them what&rsquo;s best for them, you ask people what they need,&rdquo; says Dr. Sandra Bucerius.</p> <p>Chief Rod Knecht adds, &ldquo;There are challenges throughout the city, but I think we&rsquo;ve made some real strides with this community, and with many communities in Edmonton.&nbsp; We have a group of police officers that are interested and engaged and want to see it work, and we have a community who want to be engaged.&nbsp; It&rsquo;s very encouraging to see young people say &lsquo;we want to work more closely with the police,&rsquo; you could not ask for anything better than that.&rdquo; </p> <p><b><b><a href="~/media/8A960BDCAE274B7DA78F473A4725E576.ashx" target="_blank"><b>The Somali Experience in Alberta Report</b></a></b></b></p> <p><b><a href="~/link.aspx?_id=DEBB7E007F8E470CA4E16B18448A0C57&amp;_z=z"><b>EPS Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section</b></a></b><b></b></p> <b> <p><a href="~/link.aspx?_id=2C82705579684A309A05F0FE9392D700&amp;_z=z"><b>EPS Chief&rsquo;s Advisory Council</b></a></p> </b> 21 Oct 2016 20:55:00 UT EPS Wins International Human and Civil Rights Award http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/IACP2016.aspx On October 15 at the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) annual conference in San Diego, the Edmonton Police Service was honoured to receive the IACP Human and Civil Rights Award for its Emerging Communities Framework. <p><a href="~/media/439E47CAD70648A29F0DE6520000C462.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img style="margin-bottom: 2px; height: 314px; width: 250px; float: left; margin-right: 4px;" alt="Chelsea Hawrelak, Natasha Goudar, Chief Rod Knecht, and Will Johnson, Chief of Police of Arlington, Texas, and Chair of the IACP awards selection committee." src="~/media/439E47CAD70648A29F0DE6520000C462.ashx" /></a>Last fall, as Syrian refugees began to arrive in Edmonton, the EPS Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section developed a plan to reach out to this emerging community. Beginning in January 2016, Sgt. Gary Willits and Community Operations Coordinator Iman Saidi met with most government sponsored refugee families and some privately sponsored families that arrived in Edmonton. This initial engagement helped establish a relationship with the families and dispel fear and mistrust of police &ndash; an attitude that is common among those fleeing unstable political environments.</p> <p>&ldquo;Establishing police legitimacy in the community is what makes it possible for our members to do their job&rdquo; says Natasha Goudar, Manager of the Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section. &ldquo;And the community gives us that legitimacy because we earn it. We can&rsquo;t demand it from them.&rdquo;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">With the full support of Chief Knecht, this Syrian refugee outreach plan was developed into an Emerging Communities Framework that will be applied across EPS to help build relationships with all new and emerging communities from all over the world. As part of the work of this Framework, the Equity, Diversity and Human Rights Section has developed relationships with community partners who work closely with newcomer populations, coordinated staff training on the influences of PTSD in refugee families, assisted partner agencies with presentations and orientation classes for newcomers, worked with community partners to offer&nbsp; a Police Youth Engagement Program for young people from newcomer communities and helped with police investigations where a newcomer is directly or indirectly involved.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><em>Photo: Chelsea Hawrelak, Natasha Goudar and Chief Rod Knecht accept the International Association of Chiefs of Police Human and Civil Rights Award&nbsp;with Will Johnson, Chief of Police of Arlington, Texas, and Chair of the IACP awards selection committee.</em></p> 18 Oct 2016 15:23:00 UT More awards than the Emmys http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/2016CPCATrials.aspx September 9-11, 2016, the Edmonton Police Service’s Canine Unit sent three handlers and their PSDs to Calgary to compete in the 2016 Canadian Police Canine Association trials. <p style="text-align: left; margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">As usual, our handlers represented the EPS to the fullest extent. This year, first year on the Canine streets Constable Jason Ellett and PSD Robbie achieved the highest award of<strong> &ldquo;Top Dog&rdquo;!</strong> </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">This year our PSDs were three of 29 competitors. PSD Evan and PSD Kane competed in both general duties and detection duties.<a href="http://edmontonpolicecms/sitecore/shell/Controls/Rich%20Text%20Editor/~/media/B1E3825ECB7747A1A87D006E5A09D155.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="float: left; margin: 2px 2px 2px 0px;" src="~/media/B1E3825ECB7747A1A87D006E5A09D155.ashx?h=300&amp;w=300" /></a></p> <a href="http://edmontonpolicecms/sitecore/shell/Controls/Rich%20Text%20Editor/~/media/B1E3825ECB7747A1A87D006E5A09D155.ashx"></a> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><a href="http://edmontonpolicecms/sitecore/shell/Controls/Rich%20Text%20Editor/~/media/B1E3825ECB7747A1A87D006E5A09D155.ashx"></a></p> <p><strong>Cst. Wade Eastman and PSD/DDD Evan</strong> placed: </p> <p>2<sup>nd</sup> in evidence search and <br /> 4th in detection. </p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="~/media/CFB92C2C315B45D383920B67F99C149B.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img style="float: left; margin-right: 2px;" alt="PSD Kane after Search Trials. Photo courtesy of 2016 CPCA Social Media." src="~/media/CFB92C2C315B45D383920B67F99C149B.ashx?h=243&amp;w=299" /></a><strong>Cst. Dennis Dalziel and PSD / DDD Kane </strong>placed:</p> <p>2nd in detection<br /> 5th in tracking<br /> 5th in agility<br /> 3rd in criminal apprehension and<br /> 5th overall.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="~/media/59D005F08D444105AADBF6F01582A5D0.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img style="margin-bottom: 4px; height: 300px; width: 217px; float: left; margin-right: 2px;" alt="Cst. Jason Ellett and PSD Robbie" src="~/media/59D005F08D444105AADBF6F01582A5D0.ashx?h=415&amp;w=300" /></a><strong>Cst. Jason Ellett and PSD Robbie</strong> placed:</p> <p>3rd in evidence search<br /> 1st in building search<br /> 3rd in compound search<br /> 2<sup>nd</sup> in agility and<br /> <strong>1st overall.</strong></p> <p><strong></strong></p> <p><strong></strong></p> <p><strong></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We have some special paws protecting Edmonton&rsquo;s streets. Congratulations to our outstanding handlers and their PSDs on these remarkable standings! </p> <p>Here&rsquo;s a quick video of PSD Robbie showing off his fastest paws during the fun public day event.</p> <iframe height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dvWh__fcOWo" frameborder="0" width="560"></iframe> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">A special thanks to the Calgary Police Service Canine Unit for hosting this event. </p> ]]> 03 Oct 2016 18:47:00 UT Air-1 Crew Receives Prestigious Awards http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/ALEAAward.aspx Edmonton Police Service Constables Chris Anderson and Tyler Tebbutt received the Airborne Law Enforcement Association (ALEA) Captain ‘Gus’ Crawford Memorial Aircrew of the Year Award for 2016. <p><a href="~/media/2ACF0C2E27404F47ADA306EB3F92C92B.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img style="margin-bottom: 2px; float: left; margin-right: 4px;" alt="Cst. Anderson displaying his TFO of the year recognition. " src="~/media/2ACF0C2E27404F47ADA306EB3F92C92B.ashx?h=178&amp;w=250" /></a></p> <p>Cst. Anderson was also named the ALEA Tactical Flight Officer of the Year (TFO).&nbsp; The awards were presented at the ALEA Expo in Savannah, Georgia on July 22, 2016.</p> <p>Both awards were based on the pursuit and capture of two suspects in multiple incidents in early December 2015.*&nbsp; &nbsp;&ldquo;Having our unit recognized with two awards is a great honour,&rdquo; said Staff Sergeant Troy Carriere.&nbsp; &ldquo;These awards reflect the professionalism, experience and perseverance our Air 1 members bring to work every day.&rdquo;</p> <p>Cst. Chris Anderson has been a member of the EPS for 11 years and has been a full time TFO for the past three-and-a-half years.&nbsp;&nbsp; Cst. Tyler Tebbutt has been a member of the EPS for eight years and a police pilot for the past five years.&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p>The Captain &lsquo;Gus&rsquo; Crawford Memorial Aircrew of the Year Award acknowledges a pilot and/or crewmember(s) whose flying efforts and proficiency characterize ALEA&rsquo;s motto, &ldquo;To Serve and Protect from the Air.&rdquo;</p> <p>Captain Gus Crawford was a law enforcement aviation pioneer and the commanding officer of the New York Police Department (NYPD) Aviation Bureau at the time of its founding. </p> <p>The TFO award identifies and recognizes a flight crewmember whose performance in the operation of tactical equipment and/or coordination of ground-based assets was exemplary and resulted in the successful conclusion of a call or mission.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="~/media/ED6617F58A5840FDBA59FEE810600A94.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img width="300" height="199" alt="Constables Tyler Tebbutt and Chris Anderson with the ALEA Captain &lsquo;Gus&rsquo; Crawford Memorial Airborne Crew of the year award." src="~/media/ED6617F58A5840FDBA59FEE810600A94.ashx?h=199&amp;w=300" width="300" height="199" /></a><br /> <em>Constables Tyler Tebbutt and Chris Anderson with the ALEA Captain &lsquo;Gus&rsquo; Crawford Memorial Aircrew of the year award.</em> </p> <p><b>Background</b></p> <p>*In December 2015, Southwest Division patrol members witnessed a truck collide with their parked police vehicle and flee southbound on 109 Street from 82 Avenue. Upon fleeing the area, the occupants abandoned the vehicle and attempted to steal other vehicles at gunpoint. AIR 1, crewed by Cst. Chris Anderson and Cst. Tyler Tebbutt, was able to locate the abandoned truck and the two suspects in a residential neighborhood and directed police to their location. Prior to being apprehended by ground units, the two suspects stole another vehicle and fled the area. The criminal flight response was terminated, but AIR 1 maintained visual contact as the vehicle drove in excess of 150 km/hr through south Edmonton with zero regard for public safety. With AIR 1 watching, the vehicle came to a stop at a convenience store and its occupants committed an armed robbery. The vehicle again fled the area into Sherwood Park, where the AIR 1 crew coordinated a successful pit manoeuver by a Canine Unit, leading to the arrest of the two occupants.</p> 19 Sep 2016 21:19:00 UT EPS Blues maintain Edmonton’s “City of Champions” title http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/EPSBlues2016.aspx Law enforcement officers from Canada and the United States came together from September 7-9 in Calgary to compete in the North American Police Soccer Tournament for charity. <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><a href="~/media/293237356F3C4DB2907E0A648D958EAC.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="margin-bottom: 2px; height: 296px; width: 300px; float: left; margin-right: 2px;" src="~/media/293237356F3C4DB2907E0A648D958EAC.ashx?h=345&amp;w=350" /></a>Our Blues team represented EPS well and brought home the title of NAPST Men&rsquo;s Recreation Champions. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">Throughout the weekend in Calgary, the EPS Blues faced teams from Toronto, San Francisco, Southern Alberta, Ontario, and Calgary. The only game the Blues lost was against Toronto Police Service&rsquo;s team who won 2-0 over us. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">The following games were played by the EPS Blues over the September 7-9 weekend: </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">Toronto Police vs EPS Blues 2-0 <br /> EPS Blues vs Southern AB/Ontario 1-0 <br /> EPS Blues vs San Francisco 2-0<br /> EPS Blues vs Calgary Police Service 7-1<br /> Semi-Finals: EPS Blues vs Southern AB/Ontario 2-0<br /> Final Game: EPS Blues vs San Francisco 3-0</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">In 2015, the EPS Blues travelled to San Diego for the 2015 NAPST tournament in the Master&rsquo;s division,<a href="~/media/78B684EBFA064FA8A899F229DCC203F6.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="height: 216px; width: 300px; float: right; margin: 0px 0px 2px 2px;" src="~/media/78B684EBFA064FA8A899F229DCC203F6.ashx?h=287&amp;w=400" /></a> where they made it to the Semi-Finals, but unfortunately, could not bring home the champion title. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">Each member of the Blues is proud to represent the Edmonton Police Service in the community. You can find our team playing friendly games throughout the city in events like at the Austin O&rsquo;Brian High School, All Africa Nations Tournament, the Twin Brooks Community Soccer Windup, and most recently, the 2<sup>nd</sup> Annual Woodall Cup. <a href="~/media/3A32B1953AB84E7D82249CBB6831E731.ashx"></a></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">The 2<sup>nd</sup> Annual Woodall Cup was in partnership with FC Edmonton; $7000 was raised in ticket sales alone for the Woodall Foundation. EPS Blues were wiped out from the tournament in Calgary, as the British Selects took the Woodall Cup in a 3-0 win. </p> <p style="text-align: center; margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><a href="~/media/3A32B1953AB84E7D82249CBB6831E731.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img width="351" height="161" alt="" src="~/media/3A32B1953AB84E7D82249CBB6831E731.ashx?h=161&amp;w=351" width="351" height="161" /></a></p> 16 Sep 2016 18:23:00 UT EPS Member Shawna Grimes wins 2016 Daughter of the Year award http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/DaughtersDay2016.aspx Award ceremony took place August 27 at City Hall. <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">Earlier this year, coworkers secretly nominated Acting Inspector Shawna Grimes for the 2016 Daughter of the Year awards, knowing she&rsquo;d be embarrassed by the attention. But her track record speaks for itself, and nobody was surprised that she won&mdash;except maybe Shawna herself.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">A member of EPS for 23 years, Shawna has held positions in Downtown Division Patrol, Training Section, Police Communications Branch, Sexual Assault Section and Homicide Section, of which she became the first female Staff Sergeant. Shawna also worked in a four-year secondment with the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT).</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">She is a member of the Victims of Homicide Support Society and sits on the board of the Sexual Assault Centre of Edmonton (SACE)&mdash;a volunteer position she continues to hold even though she no longer works in the Sexual Assault Section. &ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t realize how bad it was until I worked there,&rdquo; she says of her time in Sexual Assault. &ldquo;That crime is horrific, and the impact extends through generations.&rdquo; She notes that even today, social biases and stigma make sexual assault one of the most misunderstood and underreported crimes.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">As a mother of two teenage girls, Shawna does feel connected to the Daughters Day initiative. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not just a women&rsquo;s issue, it&rsquo;s everyone&rsquo;s issue. If we can create equality in general, for people of every gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation and religion, the world will be a better place for my girls.&rdquo;</p> <p>Since 2012, Daughters Day has recognized inspiring women who make a difference in Edmonton in areas such as the arts, business, volunteerism, education, health, human rights, public service, science and sports. EPS Constable Mona Gill received a <a href="https://youtu.be/CVf8HIN_wZM" target="_blank">Daughter of the Year award in 2013</a>.</p> <p><em>Photo courtesy of <em>Bruce Edwards / Edmonton Journal</em>.</em></p> ]]> 29 Aug 2016 21:05:00 UT EPS Community Station Closures http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/CommunityStationClosure.aspx On June 16, 2016 the Edmonton Police Commission supported the gradual closing of public reporting counters at all community stations across Edmonton, and a complete closure of other community facilities. <p>Old Strathcona* and Namao Community Stations will close September 1, 2016 and other locations will follow, based on the provisions of their existing lease contracts. </p> <p>Police officers working on the front reporting counters will be redeployed, as determined by community needs. In those locations where only the front counter has closed, police officers will continue to work out of the existing building. Where the entire facility has closed, both Edmonton school boards have expressed a willingness to provide office space in nearby schools and school board buildings.&nbsp;This will reduce the need for District police officers to return to main Divisional stations over the course of a shift.</p> <p>Station closure decisions are never easy.&nbsp;However, since 2005, workloads at these facilities have decreased significantly due to changes in the reporting habits of citizens and new ways of reporting crime (e.g. <a href="~/link.aspx?_id=094289C642F34FF09921CFE6D72CBD3B&amp;_z=z" target="_blank">online crime reporting</a>), which make it easier for a citizen to report from home. </p> <p>Signage will be placed at the station redirecting citizens to <a href="~/link.aspx?_id=231844978A934B95B8360924F0A3C8BA&amp;_z=z" target="_blank">other police facilities </a>in the area, and to <a href="~/link.aspx?_id=094289C642F34FF09921CFE6D72CBD3B&amp;_z=z" target="_blank">online crime reporting</a>.</p> <p>Individuals in the Namao area wishing to file a police report can do so by contacting the Calder Community Station 12540-132 Avenue (780-496-8535) or Northeast Division 14203-50 Street (780-426-8100).&nbsp; </p> <p>Individuals in the Old Strathcona area wishing to file a police report can do so by contacting the Southeast Community Station at 104 Youville Drive East (780-426-8200) or Downtown Division, 9620 &ndash; 103A Avenue (780-421-2200). </p> <p>*EPS members will continue to work out of the Old Strathcona&nbsp;building, but the front counter will be closed to the public. </p> ]]> 24 Aug 2016 19:23:00 UT Big Yellow Police Car http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/Car920.aspx <b>'Crushed a second time'</b> <p><a href="~/media/B11C7AAF448448378880F2B6A1D951C4.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="margin-bottom: 2px; height: 190px; width: 250px; float: left; margin-top: 2px; margin-right: 2px;" src="~/media/B11C7AAF448448378880F2B6A1D951C4.ashx?h=151&amp;w=199" /></a>For about 37 years Car 920 of the Edmonton City Police Department (ECPD) defied the elements and held its ground. It was laid down, post-auction, in a field with the hope of being dispatched for parts. It seems the call never came. </p> <p>You don&rsquo;t have to be a collision reconstructionist to tell the 1973 Chevrolet Chevelle had been t-boned &ndash; but where and at what point were mysteries. Judging by the big ECPD decals on the doors, it was damaged before Gretzky was a household name, before &lsquo;Black Friday&rsquo; and well before cell phones.&nbsp;</p> <p>The guy who seemed to know a fair bit about it was Reg, who ran the auto salvage for 59 years. He had his theories.<a href="~/media/3A5E825C47C6436D89A1A7B3D9C499D8.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="margin-bottom: 2px; height: 149px; width: 250px; float: right; margin-left: 2px; margin-top: 2px;" src="~/media/3A5E825C47C6436D89A1A7B3D9C499D8.ashx" /></a></p> <p>"It&rsquo;s a dog car, because there's no rear seats; it&rsquo;s all carpet back there," says Reg. "I always knew the police vehicles as they had a v-shaped zipper in the roof liner to wire the lights. I&rsquo;ve had a lot of police vehicles come through over the years."</p> <p>With door decals and the cage between the front and rear seats still intact, a dreamer may have said it was salvageable. That inner voice suggests we get a high school automotive class to return it to its past glory and maybe the Foundation could pay for its restoration. Then the practical voice interjects&hellip; nah, get a running one out of Arizona and besides we already have a yellow car in the EPS historical fleet.</p> <p>Case closed. The images were then forwarded to our Veteran&rsquo;s Association (EPSVA) so the alumni could reminisce about the all-yellow cars. </p> <p>On June 8th retired detective, and former Canine handler, Jim Litke emailed the EPSVA &ldquo;&hellip;I was broadsided on the passenger side of 920 and briefly knocked-out. When I woke up, I was sitting on the passenger&rsquo;s side, going down the wrong side of the street and heading for a wooden power pole. I was able to get the car stopped by stretching out my left leg and applying the brakes&hellip; Do you know where the car is, or is that an old picture? I would love to see it for old time&rsquo;s sake.&rdquo;</p> <p>Jim was eager to see 920 once more. We agreed to head out there and perhaps snap a photo of him leaning against the side, arms folded. The reunion was to be magical.&nbsp;</p> <p>Five days later Jim pulled up to the main gate just as a four-by-eight Remax "FOR SALE"&nbsp;sign was being installed. The sign guy said someone locked the gate about 25 minutes ago and drove away. <img alt="" style="margin-bottom: 2px; float: left; margin-top: 2px; margin-right: 4px;" src="~/media/CEE86975858E4C97A145F013BE0686D6.ashx?h=183&amp;w=250" /></p> <p>Jim was literally standing at the locked gates of opportunity, scanning the property, wanting to act now &ndash; he was this close. The trophy hunter then gasped, "Look down there along the tree line, something&rsquo;s moving.&rdquo; We could see a figure in blue coveralls sauntering toward us. It was 77-year-old Reg. As he got within a quarter of a mile he used a hand gesture like a baseball umpire confirming the player was safe: both of his hands extended low and outward. Did it mean they were closed? Was he angry?&nbsp; </p> <p>&ldquo;She&rsquo;s gone boys. It was crushed last week,&rdquo; Reg said with a heavy heart. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m shuttin&rsquo; her down, getting too old for this. I had a car crusher here six days ago.&rdquo;</p> <p>Jim would have seriously considered buying the car that day and Reg finally had the buyer he had been waiting for. After 37 years both of them were six days short of walking away satisfied. Joni Mitchell may have penned it best in Big Yellow Taxi&hellip; &ldquo;You don't know what you got 'til it's gone&rdquo;. </p> 27 Jun 2016 14:45:00 UT