Success Stories http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/news/successstories/ Below is a list of stories and articles about the Edmonton Police Service and its members. en 23 Feb 2018 16:04:19 UT Commitment to Professionalism - Reduced Crime &amp; Victimization - Investigative Excellence - Increased Efficiency &amp; Effectiveness<br /> Copyright &copy; 2018, Edmonton Police Service. All rights reserved. Chief fires back at criticism of homicide victim naming policy http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/KnechtEditorialFeb2018.aspx <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span><em>&nbsp;Published in the February 1, 2018 edition of the Edmonton Journal Editorial Section</em></span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>Despite repeated attempts to provide Paula Simons with the reasons governing our controlled release of information on homicide files, she continues to assert that the EPS is cloaking those releases in &ldquo;. . . an aura of mystery&rdquo; and &ldquo;. . . keeping the truth about who&rsquo;s dying [homicide victims] in the dark.&rdquo;&nbsp; Nothing could be further from the truth.<br /> <br /> The rule of law means that the law applies equally to everyone and that no one is above the law.&nbsp; Our politicians, the wealthy, celebrities, judges . . . everyone must obey the law.&nbsp; There is an even stronger public expectation that Police will follow these same laws.&nbsp; <br /> <br /> Alberta&rsquo;s privacy legislation is contained within the <em>Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIPP)</em>.&nbsp; The EPS must abide by the FOIPP provisions, as must every police service in Alberta, with the exception of the RCMP, who are governed by similar federal legislation.&nbsp; The EPS participated in an Alberta Association of Chiefs of Police (AACP) committee mandated to establish consistent practices regarding the naming of homicide victims, hosted by the Solicitor General&rsquo;s office.&nbsp; The result of that committee&rsquo;s work was a framework, endorsed by the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta, that allowed all AACP agencies to approach this issue in a consistent manner.&nbsp; This was made available to all media outlets, and Ms. Simons is well aware of its provisions. <br /> <br /> While it is impossible here to explain all of the considerations that go into deciding whether a homicide victim&rsquo;s name should be released, I will highlight the most important points.&nbsp; Section 17(4) of the FOIPP Act makes it clear that the disclosure of a homicide victim&rsquo;s name is presumed to be an unreasonable invasion of their personal privacy.&nbsp; Therefore, in order to release the name, the circumstances supporting release must outweigh the presumption of privacy.&nbsp; This must be determined on a case-by-case basis, while considering ALL of the relevant circumstances. <br /> <br /> Section 40(1) (c) allows a public body to disclose personal information for the purpose for which it was collected or a use consistent with that purpose, such as investigative necessity.&nbsp; Where it is reasonable and necessary to further a homicide investigation, releasing the name of the victim <em>may</em> be appropriate. &nbsp;That is not the situation with our latest homicide.&nbsp; <br /> <br /> Contrary to Ms. Simons&rsquo; unwavering opinion, the mere fact that an individual has been the victim of a homicide is not legally sufficient rationale to disclose that individual&rsquo;s name.&nbsp; Section 32 of the FOIPP Act requires that a matter must be <strong>&ldquo;clearly in the public interest&rdquo;</strong> as opposed to a matter that may simply be &ldquo;<em>of interest</em> <em>to the public</em>&rdquo;.&nbsp; Mere public curiosity is not enough to disregard the privacy rights of the victim and their family.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>The EPS has not made &ldquo;. . . a radical change in practice&rdquo; as alleged by Ms. Simons, as we have been following these rules for the past number of years.&nbsp; What has changed is the realization that we are now further required by law to only release as much personal information as necessary to solve crimes. &nbsp;</span><span>Arbitrary publication of the personal information of every homicide victim&nbsp;would go&nbsp;against privacy legislation, potentially put&nbsp;critical investigations and prosecutions at risk, and&nbsp;contravene the wishes of many family members who are suffering&nbsp;through unimaginable loss.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Police must follow the law. &nbsp;We are accountable to the families of the victims, who don&rsquo;t want today&rsquo;s grief to become tomorrow&rsquo;s headlines or social media musings, to the courts, who want facts and&nbsp;information that are&nbsp;untainted by&nbsp;reckless&nbsp;media speculation, and to the communities we serve.&nbsp; It is perplexing to be criticized repeatedly when we stand by the principles of legislation and the dignity of those who are suffering the greatest of loss.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <br /> To avoid criticism, the easy thing would be to unlawfully and unethically publish the name of every homicide victim. &nbsp;I would rather take the criticism and do what is right.</span></p> 01 Feb 2018 15:58:46 UT This is Who We Are - EPS Pipes and Drums http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/TIWWAPipesDrums.aspx Since the early days of policing in Edmonton the bagpipes have boosted the spirits of those sworn to serve. <div class="flex-video" style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Mj1aYQstORo?rel=0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media"></iframe></div> <p>In 1914, twelve men from the Edmonton Caledonina Pipe band, some of which were Edmonton police officers, joined the Princess Patricia&rsquo;s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI) and were whisked off to Europe to serve in WWI as pipers and stretcher bearers. These men served with bravery and valour using their musical talent to boost the morale and kinship of the troops. At the end of the war, those who survived returned to their civilian lives back in Canada.</p> <p>It wasn&rsquo;t until 1959 that the pipes came calling again for members of the Edmonton Police Service. In that year the a collection of pipers and drummers with Scottish and Irish heritage began rehearsing with the intention of creating a band. Two years later, this group auditioned for the Chief who endorsed them as the official band of the Edmonton Police Service. Since 1961, the Pipes and Drums of the EPS have been performing locally, nationally and internationally from private homes for audiences of one; to stadiums filled to capacity. In this time, the band has forged allegiances with several military regiments including the PPCLI, the Loyal Edmonton Regiment, the Airborne Regiment, and the HMCS Edmonton. </p> <p>The gift of music, fellowship, service and tradition have taken the band to a variety of international locations where it has been shared with many including children, seniors, veterans, British royalty, and currently serving military and police personnel. With each note played, the band members, both current and alumni, stand together as proud representatives of the men and women of the Edmonton Police Service, dedicated to protect, proud to serve.</p> 10 Jan 2018 17:38:48 UT Constable Mike Chernyk says, "Thank You" http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/ChernykThankYou.aspx "I have been very moved by your encouragement, and it is important to me to personally thank Edmontonians, Albertans and Canadians for their kind words, well wishes and cards." <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;"><a href="~/media/A4D97D6355D34A7B9840CB33A8230649.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 300px; height: 422px; margin-right: 3px; margin-left: 0px; float: left;" src="~/media/A4D97D6355D34A7B9840CB33A8230649.ashx?h=422&amp;w=300" /></a>"The last eight weeks have finally returned to normal for me. I cannot believe the outpouring of support I&rsquo;ve received since September 30<sup>th</sup>.<span>&nbsp; </span>I have been very moved by your encouragement, and it is important to me to personally thank Edmontonians, Albertans and Canadians for their kind words, well wishes and cards. It is this continued support that has fuelled me to heal and return to work.<span>&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">I especially want to thank the school children, citizens and police services from across the country who sent me such nice cards and letters. Thank you also to the Edmonton Oilers and the Edmonton Eskimos for honouring the EPS in such meaningful ways.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">This incident will not deter me from my police career.<span>&nbsp; </span>If anything, it has made me and my police family stronger, and seems to have united Canadians from coast to coast. I&rsquo;ve received emails from people I&rsquo;ve never met, including other officers who said that what I did has made them more vigilant and want to train harder. <span>&nbsp;</span>We get into policing because we want to help people and do the right thing for the right reasons, so if what happened to me inspires people and brings them together, then I really can&rsquo;t ask for more than that. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">While I don&rsquo;t wish to remain in the spotlight, I wanted to acknowledge your kindness, and to assure my community I will continue to be 'dedicated to protect and proud to serve' as a member of the Edmonton Police Service." </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;">- Constable Mike Chernyk</p> 24 Nov 2017 21:36:47 UT EPS Cyber Crimes find illegal substances sold to Canadians on Darkweb http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/DarkWebInvestigation.aspx Earlier this year, the Edmonton Police Cyber Crimes Investigative Detail became aware of suspicious activity on the dark web from a partner agency. <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">This summer, officers came upon information that a highly radio-active and toxic metal (polonium-210) was being sold on the Darknet Marketplace to Canadians. Upon initial investigation, the suspects appeared to be residing and operating in Germany, so&nbsp;the Edmonton Police Service shared their intelligence with multiple German law enforcement agencies. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">The German Federal Criminal Office launched an official investigation in July 2017 after receiving sensitive information that several persons were in violation of the Narcotics Act, the War Weapons Control Act and the Chemicals Act. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Three men were charged in relation to possession and trafficking fentanyl hydrochloride, carfentanyl hydrochloride and bioterrorism weapons (botulinum toxin and potassium cyanide). Several litres of unknown liquids, powder-like substances and other paraphernalia were seized. <span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">As technology has progressed, criminals have created new ways to commit crimes. <span>&nbsp;</span>Often, the dark web is misused by criminals because it provides more anonymity.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span>&ldquo;This file highlights the real-time intelligence shared between international policing agencies,&rdquo; says Deputy Chief Greg Preston. &ldquo;Our EPS officers are truly committed to creating safer communities around the globe.&rdquo; </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">EPS Cyber Crimes Investigation Detail was formalized about two years ago. Criminals are more frequently exploiting the speed, ease and anonymity of the Internet to commit a diverse range of criminal activities that lack borders, either physical or virtual. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">For more information about this investigation, please contact the <a href="mailto:pressestelle¬@sta-koeln.nrw.de">Cologne State Prosecutor&rsquo;s Office</a> and see their <a href="http://www.zoll.de/SharedDocs/Pressemitteilungen/DE/Rauschgift/2017/y29_darknet_dealer.html">news release</a> (in German) for details. </p> ]]> 08 Nov 2017 21:56:59 UT Canine Unit fetches Top Dog award http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/CPCA2017.aspx September 15-17 was a weekend for learning, honouring those who led us here, and, of course, friendly competition between canine teams from across Canada. <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5PICsUSjkSY?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><a href="~/media/9A2805AA669F4B9A94EBA7E493497284.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 267px; height: 400px; margin-right: 2px; margin-bottom: 2px; float: left;" src="~/media/9A2805AA669F4B9A94EBA7E493497284.ashx?h=400&amp;w=267" /></a>The Edmonton Police Service&rsquo;s Canine Unit hosted the 2017 Canadian Police Canine Association Trials in celebration of their unit&rsquo;s 50<sup>th</sup> year within EPS and as celebration for EPS&rsquo; 125<sup>th</sup> anniversary. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Our Canine Unit represented our Service to the utmost respect. Our members spent exhaustive amounts of time and effort to put on a perfect weekend for all competitors and the public, and they outdid themselves. It was a weekend for handlers to learn from one another and for the public to see what our members, both two and four-legged, do every single day to keep our cities safe. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Our five teams were remarkable and truly proved how strong our training and skills are, but it reinforced the importance of this special partnership our Canine members have with PSDs. It is our handlers' and PSDs&rsquo; teamwork and dedication to their craft that make our Service worthy of such achievements as Top Dog. Congratulations to all five teams for your hard work through the weekend&rsquo;s difficult competitions.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Some may say we had the home advantage, but for the third year in a row, a member from our unit took the Top Dog award - Constable Nick Leachman and PSD Finn. Three out of our five teams placed in the Top 5 overall!</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong>Cst. Tony Costa &amp; PSD Amok</strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#4 Evidence Search</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#2 Building Search</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#2 Compound Search</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong>Cst. Lauren Croxford &amp; PSD Bender</strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#4 Agility</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong>Cst. Bryan Langevin &amp; PSD Fallon</strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#1 Agility</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#3 Building Search</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#5 Overall</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong>Cst. Ryan Busby &amp; PSD Jagger:</strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#1 Obedience</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#2 Agility</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#3 Compound Search</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#2 Apprehension</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#3 Overall</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong>Cst. Nick Leachman &amp; PSD Finn:</strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#3 Obedience</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#3 Agility</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#5 Apprehension</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">#4 Tracking</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong>#1 Overall</strong></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><strong><a href="~/media/D661BCDCDA504FEFBFC107DB4CCE52C7.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 450px; height: 300px;" src="~/media/D661BCDCDA504FEFBFC107DB4CCE52C7.ashx?h=300&amp;&amp;w=450" /></a><a href="~/media/0F2FD2C5A405496B9BBA40B1AABA31F4.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 450px; height: 300px;" src="~/media/0F2FD2C5A405496B9BBA40B1AABA31F4.ashx?h=300&amp;w=450" /></a>&nbsp;</strong></p> 20 Sep 2017 20:10:40 UT EPS 125 Picnic in the Park http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/PicnicInThePark.aspx Over 3,000 people came out for a fun afternoon in Borden Park to help EPS celebrate its 125th anniversary on August 20, 2017. <div class="flex-video" style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6OD5P7Dtap0?rel=0&amp;showinfo=0" frameborder="0"></iframe>&nbsp;</div> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>The EPS Picnic in the Park on August 20, 2017, provided a unique opportunity to showcase 125 years of policing in Edmonton, and for the public to interact with police in more casual setting.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>There were family activities, games, hot dogs, prize draws, entertainment, as well as displays from EPS specialized units such as Air One, Tactical, Canine, Traffic, and Crime Scenes Investigation (CSI).</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span><a href="~/media/16CA47C9761E467592B6501572B2C2E8.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 250px; height: 167px; margin-top: 2px;" src="~/media/16CA47C9761E467592B6501572B2C2E8.ashx?h=167&amp;w=250" /></a><a href="~/media/6F2CEF9B0BE44627BBE557332CC8D0C0.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 256px; height: 167px;" src="~/media/6F2CEF9B0BE44627BBE557332CC8D0C0.ashx?h=167&amp;w=256" /></a><a href="~/media/CCC75CB4B5D848A7913057DABD6D805D.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" width="326" height="167" style="width: 326px; height: 167px;" src="~/media/CCC75CB4B5D848A7913057DABD6D805D.ashx?h=167&amp;&amp;w=326" /></a></span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>Sometimes people feel uneasy around police, but crowds gathered for selfies with officers, new and old police vehicles, and the popular EPS mascot Barney the Bear. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>Children of all ages took part in the Emergency Vehicle Operation Course and the Officer Skills Challenge, and some preschool officers-in-training showed up in their own police uniforms ready for action.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span><a href="~/media/D1AE0FC949CF439B9FE410A79C16E94E.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 167px; height: 250px; margin-top: 2px; margin-right: 2px; margin-bottom: 2px; float: left;" src="~/media/D1AE0FC949CF439B9FE410A79C16E94E.ashx?h=250&amp;w=167" /></a>It was &lsquo;Back to the Future&rsquo; when EPS Recruit Training Class #140 challenged kids to an old-fashioned tug of war and sack race, and to follow in the footsteps of Canada&rsquo;s first Indigenous police officer and Olympian in the Constable Alex Decoteau Dash.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>Much like other picnics and get-togethers, it featured toe-tapping music.&nbsp; Performers included: Adrian LaChance; the Running Thunder Dancers and Drummers; Sangea Academy West African Drumming and Dancing; the Mojave Iguanas; Hailey Benedict; the EPS Pipes and Drums; and the EPS officer band New Routes.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>The picnic concluded with the take-off and fly-by of the Air One helicopter to the cheers and waves of the crowd, who shared their enthusiasm and appreciation on social media.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&ldquo;Throughout our anniversary celebrations we&rsquo;ve seen an outpouring of appreciation and support from the community that we&rsquo;re truly thankful for,&rdquo; said Chief Knecht. &nbsp;&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a sense of pride in what we&rsquo;ve accomplished together and where we&rsquo;re going as a police service.&rdquo; </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>The Picnic in the Park would not have been possible without the generous support of the Edmonton Police Foundation.&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><span>Karla Schell, Executive Director of the Edmonton Police Foundation, added, &ldquo;Police play a vital role in our community every day, but when you consider the impact a police officer has on a child&rsquo;s life simply by playing with them, it&rsquo;s clear that an event like this is an investment in the future.&rdquo;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt; text-align: center;"><span><a href="~/media/4E0D7008359545EFB539D5DF1A9F6C99.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 400px; height: 267px; text-align: center;" src="~/media/4E0D7008359545EFB539D5DF1A9F6C99.ashx?h=267&amp;w=400" /></a></span></p> 29 Aug 2017 17:32:47 UT This is Who We Are - Human Trafficking & Exploitation Unit http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/TIWWA_HTEU.aspx Earlier this year, “VICE Unit” transitioned their name to, “Human Trafficking and Exploitation Unit.” <div class="flex-video"> <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Qp1NDhm_5PQ?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe></div> <p>This change is a clear reflection of the evolution of the realities of investigations conducted by the Edmonton Police Service. This name change is also aligned with other policing agencies in Canada and is appreciated by advocacy groups and partner agencies that offer support to victims of exploitation.</p> 15 Aug 2017 21:08:49 UT This is Who We Are - Marine Unit http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/TIWWAMarineUnit.aspx The Edmonton Police Service Marine Unit will be out on the North Saskatchewan River this summer to ensure citizens are safe while taking part in recreational activities on the water. <div class="flex-video"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_JEgESwOx4U?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe></div> <p>The Marine Unit patrols about 50 km of the North Saskatchewan River by jet boat and Sea-doos, providing education and enforcement of offences relating to river use, liquor and noise. Officers will be checking that boat operators have the proper licence, and all river users have the required safety equipment, such as a lifejacket with a whistle.<br /> <br /> Citizens are encouraged to visit the <a href="http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/marinesafety/TP-511e.pdf" target="_blank">Safe Boating Guide</a> available&nbsp;from Transport Canada&nbsp;for a complete list of boat safety regulations, and the <a href="https://weather.gc.ca/" target="_blank">Environment Canada</a> website to check weather and water levels. <hr /> Watch our previous <a href="~/link.aspx?_id=EE3E8C7DEBD842F391E075BC2E6B5402&amp;_z=z">This is Who We Are / This is Who I Am </a>videos.</p> 26 Jul 2017 19:21:37 UT Happy Birthday, EPS! http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/HappyBirthdayEPS.aspx June 20 was our official 125th birthday! On that day in 1892, Edmonton Mayor Matthew McCauley issued Bylaw #15, which gave town council the ability to assemble its own police force. <div class="flex-video"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cnkuepSSE60?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe></div> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Chief Knecht, Councillor Scott McKeen, and many other dignitaries, retired members and employees came together at City Hall to celebrate with cake and an official proclamation of June 20 as Edmonton Police Service Day. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Special guests included Ted Collinson, a retired member who joined the EPS in 1953, before there were even Recruit Training Classes. &ldquo;They sent me up to the chief&rsquo;s office, I had an interview with him, they took me over to City Hall, swore me in as a police constable,&rdquo; said Collinson. &ldquo;Came back and picked up my uniform downtown and he says, &lsquo;Can you start tonight?&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Another veteran, Joan Crawford, spoke to reporters about her experience being one of the earliest women in the service when she joined in 1959. &ldquo;I was number 15, of 15 ladies,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Later on when they renumbered us, I was number 4.&rdquo; </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Ted and Joan joined many employees in a group photo that showcased the wide variety of roles required to police a city of almost a million people. </p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">Later that evening, the High Level bridge was lit up in blue and red to mark the occasion.</p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"><a href="~/media/F36BC3E3734F47D2A898CE866543E400.ashx" rel="lightbox"><img alt="" style="width: 400px; height: 300px;" src="~/media/F36BC3E3734F47D2A898CE866543E400.ashx?h=300&amp;w=400" /></a></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;">&nbsp;</p> 21 Jun 2017 21:23:13 UT EPS' 125 years of Service http://www.edmontonpolice.ca/News/SuccessStories/EPS125GalaVideo.aspx It’s safe to say that over the past 125 years, Edmonton has matured from a community of 700 with one lone Town Constable in 1892 to a population of over 1.3 million in the greater metro area today, with over 2,500 people working for the Edmonton Police Service. <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_RjFsy3j0F4?rel=0" frameborder="0"></iframe> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>Ever since Mayor Matthew McCauley issued bylaw #15 in 1892, establishing a single constable to protect 700 citizens, the EPS&rsquo;s growth and development has been intertwined with this city.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>When EPS&rsquo;s first constable P. D. Campbell was hired on July 21, 1892, he was paid $50 per month. Today, a first year constable earns $65,930.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>In 1905, the annual police expenses were $4,424. Today the 2017 budget is nearly $300 million. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>The EPS&rsquo;s first Kissel Kar patrol wagon, supplied by the Scott Motor Company of Edmonton, was purchased on February 26, 1913 for $1,500.00.&nbsp;Today, a police vehicle costs $65,000. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>Gone are the days when a police organization was run with a few constables and two horses. Times may have changed since the service was first established, but one thing has always remained constant; the pride that members take in the profession, the department, and their community. Members of the EPS continue to be Dedicated to Protect, and Proud to Serve. </span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>As part of the year&rsquo;s celebrations, this video was produced using archival photos and film, including a ride along filmed by CBC in 1968. The eight-minute video captures the &lsquo;esprit de corps&rsquo; of the EPS.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 1.8pt 10pt 0cm;"><span>Future <a href="~/link.aspx?_id=03B7346CCB874337816E1878619035A1&amp;_z=z">EPS 125 events </a>for citizens to come out and celebrate are the Civic Celebration at Edmonton City Hall @ 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 20, and the Public Picnic at Borden Park on Sunday, August 20.</span></p> 05 Jun 2017 19:34:00 UT